home barbell routine

At home barbell workout

Training at home?

You have got the right home gym equipment? That’s Great! Now this barbell programme to progress yourself thought the novice part of your fitness journey.

This programme is broken into three workouts, all working the whole body. You can do them twice a week with two days in between,e.g. Monday & Thursday. Or three days a week with one day in between, e.g. Monday, Wednesday & Friday. Or any variation of these.

DAY 1

EXERCISE 1: Low barbell squats

Warm up

As a warm up lower your backside straight down allowing your elbows between your knees and push out. If you can’t get below parallel with your thighs one of three things are probably wrong.

  1. Feet aren’t wide enough. Heels should be shoulder width.
  2. Toes are pointing the wrong way. Toes should point out at 30 degrees.
  3. Knees are dropping in. Knees should be push out in line with the toes.

Your feet should now be flat on the floor and you SHOULD BE lent forward a lot, with hips below the top of your knees.

If your still not getting low enough it may be your body simply doesn’t have the strength to get you back up yet so its not letting you down. Work with body weight on getting the depth then gradually build the weight.

Start of session

Come under the empty barbell, placing it across the middle of your shoulder blades, just under the spiny ridge. Stand back from the rack with your heels shoulder width apart and toes turned slightly out. raise the chest and elbow to lock the bar in place. Now lower the hips down and lean forward at the same angle you did in the warm up stretch.

From the bottom of the squat KEEP the knees out with your mind, and drive the hips upwards. Let the shoulders come up with the hips so you remain lent forward until you reach the top.

Lower yourself back down again keeping the knees out using your mind.

Do five reps and rest for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Next set do a little heavier, until you feel light fatigue or slight loss of form. If you run out of weight start to gradually speed up instead.

Perform 2 more sets and the same intensity as the last with a 2 minute rest in between. If you can get to hips below knees just do 3 sets as low as you can then move to the next exercise.

EXERCISE 2: Barbell Press

Grip the barbell one hand wider than shoulder width apart, if it’s not on a rack raise it up on to your shoulders, push the elbows forward and in so the weight of the bar rests on your shoulders not in your hands.

Brace the body by taking a deep breath then squeezing the legs and abs. Keep looking straight forward and jolt your hips forward, this creates a small recoil to get the bar moving. As the bar bounces, push the bar straight up as close to the nose as possible, without hitting it. Lock the arm out at the top with elbows pointing down and shoulders shrugged up as though you’re not quite at the top.

Return the bar to the shoulders, again avoiding the nose, and repeat.

Do five reps and rest for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Next set do a little heavier, until you feel light fatigue or slight loss of form. If you run out of weight go fast instead.

Perform 2 more sets and the same intensity as the last with a 2 minute rest in between. If you are doing partial range just do 3 sets and more to the next exercise.

EXERCISE 3: Barbell Deadlift

With the bar on the floor step forward so your feet are under the bar and the bar is 1″ from your vertical shin, about 8″ to 12″ apart, toes turn out 30 degrees.

Lean forward take hold of the bar just outside of the legs, around shoulder width. Bring your knees forward until your shine touches the bar without moving it. Now flatten your back take a deep breath in and brace the shoulders with the chest pulled up.

DRAG the bar up the leg, without breaking contact, until you are stood vertical with the shoulders pulled back. There is no need to lean back at the top it will screw your back up.

Do five reps and rest for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Next set do a little heavier, until you feel light fatigue or slight loss of form.

You will only be doing one working set of deadlift due to the stress it can place on the body.

DAY 2

EXERCISE 1: Low barbell squats

Repeat as per day one but try to go a little faster.

EXERCISE 2: Barbell Bench Press

This can be done on a bench or on the floor if you don’t have a bench.

Lying on your back with a barbell in hand stick your elbows out away from the body somewhere between 70 and 85 degrees. At 90 degrees you risk shoulder impingement commonly known as rotator cuff syndrome. Your forearm should be vertically over the elbow.

Arch the back though its full length and take a deep breath, bracing the body. Lower the barbell down so the bar is in line with your nipples.

Push the barbell back up to finish over your shoulders at the top and breathe out. Then repeat.

Do five reps and rest for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Next set do a little heavier, until you feel light fatigue or slight loss of form.

Perform 2 more sets and the same intensity as the last with a 2 minute rest in between. If you are doing partial range just do 3 sets and more to the next exercise.

EXERCISE 3: Barbell Deadlift

Repeat as per day one but try to go a little heavier. If you run out of weight go faster.


PROGRESSION

The ideal progression would be an increase in weight by around 2.5 – 5 Kg (5 -10 lbs) each session. To progress these exercise in the absence of more weight to add you need to try and work faster.

When you can complete the exercise on your heaviest weight (all working sets and reps)

Increasing weight

Reduce weight by 20% and add 2 more sets. i.e. form 3 set of 5 to 5 sets of 5 and begin the progression again.

Increasing speed

If you can’t go at least 10 seconds faster maintaining the same length rest between sets, add another set. i.e. go from 3 working sets to 4, then 4 to 5 etc. You can do as many as 10 working sets of 5 reps.

DON’T BE TEMPTED TO DO MORE REPS YET THOUGH!!! The goal is strength to start with, a reps range of 1 to 5 reps targets strength, higher than that the body adaption becomes hypertrophy not strength. Doing more reps will make you bigger without becoming substantially stronger or faster. Stay at 5 reps you will get stronger, faster and bigger.

Here are 4 other routines you can try yourself.

At home body weight workout

At home dumbbell workout

At home kettle bell workout

At home TRX (suspension trainer) workout

TRX home workout

At home TRX (suspension trainer) workout

Training at home?

Not got much home gym equipment? Not a problem use this TRX programme to progress yourself thought the early part of your fitness journey.

This programme is broken into two workouts, both working the whole body. You can do them twice a week with two days in between, e.g. Monday & Thursday. Or three times a week with one day in between, e.g. Monday, Wednesday & Friday. Or any variation of these.

DAY 1

EXERCISE 1: TRX Squats

Adjust the straps to mid length and stand facing the anchor point. Hands should be pulled tight into the arm pit. With your heels shoulder width apart and toes turned slightly out.

Lower your backside straight down allowing your elbows to move forward. If you can’t get that low don’t worry just go as low as you can.

Your feet should now be flat on the floor and you SHOULD BE lent forward a little, with hips below the top of your knees.

From the bottom of the squat KEEP the knees out with your mind, and drive the hips upwards. Let the shoulders come up with the hips so you remain lent forward until you reach the top. Pull as little as possible on the straps you want your legs to do the work, the TRX should merely guild the movement.

Lower yourself back down again keeping the knees out using your mind.

Do five reps and rest for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Next set do a little faster, until you feel light fatigue or slight loss of form. If you run out of weight start to gradually speed up instead.

Perform 2 more sets and the same intensity as the last with a 2 minute rest in between. If you can get to hips below knees just do 3 sets as low as you can then move to the next exercise.

EXERCISE 2: TRX Shoulder Press

Extend the straps to full length and face away from the anchor point. Stand upright with a handle in each hand at shoulder height (similar to the top of the dumbbell front squat). Lean slightly forward to place tension on the shoulder. Push the TRX handles straight up over head locking out the elbows and shrug in to the top of the press (as though you’re not quite there). Lower back down and breath out then repeat.

Do five reps and rest for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Next set take a small step towards the anchor point, about 6″ and repeat until you feel light fatigue or slight loss of form. If you run out of room go fast instead.

Perform 2 more sets and the same intensity as the last with a 2 minute rest in between. If you are doing partial range just do 3 sets and more to the next exercise.

EXERCISE 3: TRX row

Use a mid length strap facing the anchor point. With a handle in each hand lean back and lower yourself to full arm extension. Keeping the body ridged pull the hand back to the side of the chest.

Do five reps and rest for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Next set take a small step towards the anchor point, about 6″ and repeat until you feel light fatigue or slight loss of form. If you run out of room go fast instead.

Perform 2 more sets and the same intensity as the last with a 2 minute rest in between. If you are doing partial range just do 3 sets and more to the next exercise.

DAY 2

EXERCISE 1: TRX Squats

Repeat as per day one but try to go a little faster.

EXERCISE 2: TRX Chest Press

Lengthen the straps to full length. Place them over your shoulders facing away from the anchor point with a handle in each hand stick your elbows out away from the body somewhere between 45 and 85 degrees. At 90 degrees you risk shoulder impingement commonly known as rotator cuff syndrome. Your forearm should be near parallel with the TRX straps. The actual position the palm of the hand faces is inconsequential at this stage.

Keep the body straight though its full length and take a deep breath, bracing the body. Push the hand forward and bring them closer together, without cutting your ears off with the straps at the top.

Lower back down and breathe out. Then repeat.

Do five reps and rest for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Next set take a small step towards the anchor point, about 6″ and repeat until you feel light fatigue or slight loss of form. If you run out of room go fast instead.

Perform 2 more sets and the same intensity as the last with a 2 minute rest in between. If you are doing partial range just do 3 sets and more to the next exercise.

EXERCISE 3: TRX Row

Repeat as per day one but try to go a little heavier. If you run out of weight go faster.


PROGRESSION

The ideal progression would be an increase in angle by around 10 degree 6″ step each session. To progress these exercise in the absence of more angle to add you need to try and work faster.

When you can’t complete the exercise (all working sets and reps)

Increasing angle

Reduce angle by 20% and add 2 more sets. i.e. form 3 set of 5 to 5 sets of 5 and begin the progression again.

Increasing speed

If you can’t go at least 10 seconds faster maintaining the same length rest between sets, add another set. i.e. go from 3 working sets to 4, then 4 to 5 etc. You can do as many as 10 working sets of 5 reps.

DON’T BE TEMPTED TO DO MORE REPS YET THOUGH!!! The goal is strength to start with, a reps range of 1 to 5 reps targets strength, higher than that the body adaption becomes hypertrophy not strength. Doing more reps will make you bigger without becoming substantially stronger or faster. Stay at 5 reps you will get stronger, faster and bigger.

Here are 4 other routines you can try yourself.

At home body weight workout

At home dumbbell workout

At home kettle bell workout

At home barbell workout

Kettle bell home workout

At home kettle bell workout

Training at home?

Not got much home gym equipment? Not a problem use this kettle bell programme to progress yourself through the early part of your fitness journey.

This programme is broken into two workouts, both working the whole body. You can do them twice a week with two days in between, e.g. Monday & Thursday. Or three days a week with one day in between, e.g. Monday, Wednesday & Friday. Or any variation of these.

It does not include the swing as the swing exercise is designed to produce power not strength. Strength is the goal of this programme. While Romanian deadlift is a strength exercise I doubt many of you will have access to a kettle bell heavy enough to tax your current strength levels.

DAY 1

EXERCISE 1: Double Kettle bell Rack Squats

Stand with your heels shoulder width apart and toes turned slightly out. Hold a kettle bell racked in each hand. i.e. kettle bell should hang off the back of the hand at shoulder height with the hands together and the forearms and elbows pressed to the rib cage.

Lower your backside straight down allowing your elbows between your knees. If you can’t get that low don’t worry just go as low as you can.

Your feet should now be flat on the floor and you SHOULD BE lent forward a little, with hips below the top of your knees.

From the bottom of the squat KEEP the knees out with your mind, and drive the hips upwards. Let the shoulders come up with the hips so you remain lent forward until you reach the top.

Lower yourself back down again keeping the knees out using your mind.

Do five reps and rest for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Next set do a little heavier, until you feel light fatigue or slight loss of form. If you run out of weight start to gradually speed up instead.

Perform 2 more sets at the same intensity as the last with a 2 minute rest in between. If you can get to hips below knees just do 3 sets as low as you can then move to the next exercise.

EXERCISE 2: Double Kettle bell shoulder press

Stand upright with a kettle bell racked in each hand at shoulder height (similar to the top of the kettle bell rack squat). Lock the legs take a deep breath and brace. Push the dumbbells straight up over head locking out the elbows and shrug in to the top of the press (as though you’re not quite there). Lower back down and breathe out then repeat.

Do five reps and rest for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Next set do a little heavier, until you feel light fatigue or slight loss of form. If you run out of weight go fast instead.

Perform 2 more sets and the same intensity as the last with a 2 minute rest in between. If you are doing partial range just do 3 sets and more to the next exercise.

EXERCISE 3: Double Kettle bell bent over row

With a kettle bell in each hand bend over by pushing your hips back with a strong back position, no camels no ducks! If you can lean forward and reach the floor with the dumbbells without affecting the back great, otherwise try a couple of low boxes.

With the kettle bells on the boxes or floor knees slightly bent, shunt the hips upward quickly, bringing the whole back and shoulders with them. Continue the movement by pulling up with the elbows past the rib cage as far as they will go. Lower the kettle bells to the boxes or floor and repeat.

Do five reps and rest for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Next set do a little faster, until you feel light fatigue or slight loss of form.

Perform 2 more sets and the same intensity as the last with a 2 minute rest in between. If you are doing partial range just do 3 sets and more to the next exercise.

DAY 2

EXERCISE 1: Double Kettle bell Rack Squats

Repeat as per day one but try to go a little faster.

EXERCISE 2: Kettle bell Chest Press

This can be done on a bench or on the floor if you don’t have a bench.

Lying on your back with a kettle bell hanging in each hand stick your elbows out away from the body somewhere between 45 and 85 degrees. At 90 degrees you risk shoulder impingement commonly known as rotator cuff syndrome. Your forearm should be vertically over the elbow. The actual position the palm of the hand faces is inconsequential at this stage.

Arch the back though its full length and take a deep breath, bracing the body. Push the hand up and bring the kettle bells together at the top.

Lower back down and breathe out. Then repeat.

Do five reps and rest for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Next set do a little faster, until you feel light fatigue or slight loss of form.

Perform 2 more sets at the same intensity as the last with a 2 minute rest in between. If you are doing partial range just do 3 sets and more to the next exercise.

EXERCISE 3: Double Kettle bell bent over Row

Repeat as per day one but try to go a little heavier. If you run out of weight go faster.


PROGRESSION

The ideal progression would be an increase in weight by around 4 Kg (8.8 lbs) each session. To progress these exercises in the absence of more weight to add, you need to try and work faster.

When you can complete the exercise with your heaviest weight (for all working sets and reps):

Increasing sets

Reduce weight by 20% and add 2 more sets. i.e. from 3 set of 5 to 5 sets of 5 and begin the progression again.

Increasing speed

If you can’t go at least 10 seconds faster maintaining the same length rest between sets, add another set. i.e. go from 3 working sets to 4, then 4 to 5 etc. You can do as many as 10 working sets of 5 reps.

DON’T BE TEMPTED TO DO MORE REPS YET THOUGH!!! The goal is strength to start with, a reps range of 1 to 5 reps targets strength, higher than that the body adaption becomes hypertrophy not strength. Doing more reps will make you bigger without becoming substantially stronger or faster. Stay at 5 reps you will get stronger, faster and bigger.

Here are 4 other routines you can try yourself.

At home body weight workout

At home dumbbell workout

At home TRX (suspension trainer) workout

At home barbell workout

Online fat burner Challenge

At home dumbbell workout

Training at home?

Not got much home gym equipment? Not a problem use this dumbbell programme to progress yourself thought the early part of your fitness journey.

This programme is broken into two workouts, both working the whole body. You can do them twice a week with two days in between, e.g. Monday & Thursday. Or three times a week with one day in between, e.g. Monday, Wednesday & Friday. Or any variation of these.

DAY 1

EXERCISE 1: Dumbbell Front Squats

Stand with your heels shoulder width apart and toes turned slightly out. Hold a dumbbell in each hand at shoulder height with elbows forward and pressed to the rib cage.

Lower your backside straight down allowing your elbows between your knees. If you can’t get that low don’t worry just go as low as you can.

Your feet should now be flat on the floor and you SHOULD BE lent forward a little, with hips below the top of your knees.

From the bottom of the squat KEEP the knees out with your mind, and drive the hips upwards. Let the shoulders come up with the hips so you remain lent forward until you reach the top.

Lower yourself back down again keeping the knees out using your mind.

Do five reps and rest for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Next set do a little heavier, until you feel light fatigue or slight loss of form. If you run out of weight start to gradually speed up instead.

Perform 2 more sets and the same intensity as the last with a 2 minute rest in between. If you can get to hips below knees just do 3 sets as low as you can then move to the next exercise.

EXERCISE 2: Dumbbell Shoulder Press

Stand upright with a dumbbell in each hand at shoulder height (similar to the top of the dumbbell front squat). Lock the legs take a deep breath and brace. Push the dumbbells straight up over head locking out the elbows and shrug in to the top of the press (as though you’re not quite there). Lower back down and breathe out then repeat.

Do five reps and rest for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Next set do a little heavier, until you feel light fatigue or slight loss of form. If you run out of weight go fast instead.

Perform 2 more sets and the same intensity as the last with a 2 minute rest in between. If you are doing partial range just do 3 sets and more to the next exercise.

EXERCISE 3: Dumbbell bent over row

With a dumbbell in each hand bend over by pushing your hips back with a strong back position, no camels, no ducks! If you can lean forward and reach the floor with the dumbbells without affecting the back great, otherwise try a couple of low boxes.

With the dumbbells on the boxes or floor knees slightly bent, shunt the hips upward quickly, bringing the whole body up an inch or two and shoulders with them. Continue the movement by pulling up with the elbows past the rib cage as far as they will go. Lower the dumbbells to the boxes or floor and repeat.

Do five reps and rest for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Next set do a little faster, until you feel light fatigue or slight loss of form.

Perform 2 more sets at the same intensity as the last with a 2 minute rest in between. If you are doing partial range just do 3 sets and more to the next exercise.

DAY 2

EXERCISE 1: Dumbbell Front Squats

Repeat as per day one but try to go a little faster.

EXERCISE 2: Dumbbell Chest Press

This can be done on a bench or on the floor if you don’t have a bench.

Lying on your back with a dumbbell in each hand stick your elbows out away from the body somewhere between 45 and 85 degrees. At 90 degrees you risk shoulder impingement commonly known as rotator cuff syndrome. Your forearm should be vertically over the elbow. The actual position the palm of the hand faces is inconsequential at this stage.

Arch the back though its full length and take a deep breath, bracing the body. Push the hand up and bring the dumbbells together at the top.

Lower back down and breathe out. Then repeat.

Do five reps and rest for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Next set do a little faster, until you feel light fatigue or slight loss of form.

Perform 2 more sets and the same intensity as the last with a 2 minute rest in between. If you are doing partial range just do 3 sets and more to the next exercise.

EXERCISE 3: Dumbbell bent over Row

Repeat as per day one but try to go a little heavier. If you run out of weight go faster.


PROGRESSION

The ideal progression would be an increase in weight by around 1 Kg (2.2 lbs) each session. To progress these exercise in the absence of more weight to add you need to try and work faster.

When you can’t complete the exercise (all working sets and reps)

Increasing weight

Reduce weight by 20% and add 2 more sets. i.e. form 3 set of 5 to 5 sets of 5 and begin the progression again.

Increasing speed

If you can’t go at least 10 seconds faster maintaining the same length rest between sets, add another set. i.e. go from 3 working sets to 4, then 4 to 5 etc. You can do as many as 10 working sets of 5 reps.

DON’T BE TEMPTED TO DO MORE REPS YET THOUGH!!! The goal is strength to start with, a reps range of 1 to 5 reps targets strength, higher than that the body adaption becomes hypertrophy not strength. Doing more reps will make you bigger without becoming substantially stronger or faster. Stay at 5 reps you will get stronger, faster and bigger.

Here are 4 other routines you can try yourself.

At home body weight workout

At home kettle bell workout

At home TRX (suspension trainer) workout

At home barbell workout

Readiness For Change

Training at Home

You don’t need a gym membership to get a good workout. Training at home is a great place to kick start your return to fitness, if you’re not already in great shape.

There is a lot of misconception about training both with and without equipment. One of the most prevalent is that more complex is better, after all that is what all the health magazines say isn’t it. You really only need the basic exercises to get the best results in the early stages of your fitness career. It’s not until you have years of CORRECT training that the basics stop working.

Another is variation, if you have ever done cross fit you’ll know this one, the theory that using different exercises each workout to surprise the muscles into stimulating more adaptation. The problem with this theory is skill, or lack of it more to the point. If you don’t do an exercise often enough to be really good at it you will never lift enough to force adaptation from it. This especially lifts like the snatch and clean and jerk, that require a massive amount of skill to progress.

So what should you do?

You only need to do a few exercises. Your initial goal should always be strength as it is the one thing present in every aspect of fitness. Endurance requires strength. The greater the strength the less percentage of effort each repetition or step is, so you can then go further or faster. Power also requires strength. As you get stronger on slow lifts (squats, deadlift & presses) you also get faster on the fast ones, as long as the skill is developed too.

“If you take two athletes with equal skill levels the strongest one will ALWAYS prevail as strength enables the skill to be used more effectively.”

Mark Rippetoe (Starting Strength)

So we need to use the movements the body uses everyday. Don’t try to single out muscles that’s not how the human body works best. More importantly the more muscles you use the greater the stimulus for adaption there is (BETTER GAINS!).

Here are the movements that I included:

Squats. We spend half our waking day doing these so the functional cross over is immense whatever the goal.

Press. Some kind of upper body pushing exercise will add balance to the body even if cardio is the primary goal.

Pull. Again balance is key.

Here are 5 routines you can try yourself.

At home body weight workout

At home dumbbell workout

At home kettle bell workout

At home TRX (suspension trainer) workout

At home barbell workout

Body weight exercise

At home body weight workout

Training at Home?

Not got any home gym equipment? Not a problem use this simple body weight programme to progress yourself through the early part of your fitness journey.

This programme is broken into two workouts, both working the whole body. You can do them twice a week with two days in between, e.g. Monday & Thursday. Three with one day in between, e.g. Monday, Wednesday & Friday. Or any variation of these.

DAY 1

EXERCISE 1: Body Weight Squats

Stand with your heels shoulder width apart and toes turned slightly out.

Lower your backside straight down place your elbows between your knees and push out. If you can’t get that low don’t worry just go as low as you can.

Your feet should now be flat on the floor and you SHOULD BE lent forward, with hips below the top of your knees.

From the bottom of the squat KEEP the knees out, with your mind, and drive the hips upwards. Let the shoulders come up with the hips so you remain lent forward until you reach the top.

Lower yourself back down again but this time don’t use the elbows on the inside of the knees use your mind again.

Do five reps and rest for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Next set do a little faster, until you feel light fatigue or slight loss of form.

Perform 2 more sets and the same intensity as the last with a 2 minute rest in between. If you can get to hips below knees just do 3 sets as low as you can then move to the next exercise.

EXERCISE 2: Inverted Shoulder Press

Adopt the press up position, now stick your hips up in the air into a downward facing dog position (yoga). Lower your head between your hands, (if you lack the strength or confidence to do this try starting on your knees first, or just do a partial range press). Keep your hips high in the air so shoulders are your main workers. Push back up and repeat.

Do five reps and rest for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Next set do a little faster, until you feel light fatigue or slight loss of form.

Perform 2 more sets and the same intensity as the last with a 2 minute rest in between. If you are doing partial range just do 3 sets and more to the next exercise.

EXERCISE 3: Inverted body weight row

So presuming you don’t have a bar and rack you can use your dining room table as it makes a great alternative. Move the chairs out of the way and lie down on your back under the table with your head just poking out.

Keeping your legs and body ridged, grip the table top at about shoulder width plus two hands apart and pull yourself up to touch your chest to the underside of the table. If you can’t get all the way up just go as far as you can.

Do five reps and rest for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Next set do a little faster, until you feel light fatigue or slight loss of form.

Perform 2 more sets and the same intensity as the last with a 2 minute rest in between. If you are doing partial range just do 3 sets and more to the next exercise.

DAY 2

EXERCISE 1: Body Weight Squats

Repeat as per day one but try to go a little faster.

EXERCISE 2: Press Ups

Starting face down hand just outside of shoulder width flat on the floor.

Keep the body ridged and push down lifting the body upward and hinging at the ball of the foot. Keep the head pulled back but looking down.

So lower the chest to the floor keeping tension on the arms at the bottom. Push back up and repeat.

Do five reps and rest for 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

Next set do a little faster, until you feel light fatigue or slight loss of form.

Perform 2 more sets and the same intensity as the last with a 2 minute rest in between. If you are doing partial range just do 3 sets and more to the next exercise.

EXERCISE 3: Inverted body weight Row

Repeat as per day one but try to go a little faster.


PROGRESSION

To progress these exercise in the absence of more weight to add you need to try and work faster.

When you can’t complete the exercise (all working sets and reps) at least 10 seconds faster maintaining the same length rest between sets, add another set. i.e. go from 3 working sets to 4, then 4 to 5 etc. You can do as many as 10 working sets of 5 reps. DON’T BE TEMPTED TO DO MORE REPS YET THOUGH!!! The goal is strength to start with, a reps range of 1 to 5 reps targets strength, higher than that the body adaption becomes hypertrophy not strength. Doing more reps will make you bigger without becoming substantially stronger or faster. Stay at 5 reps you will get stronger, faster and bigger.

Here are 4 other routines you can try yourself.

At home dumbbell workout

At home kettle bell workout

At home TRX (suspension trainer) workout

At home barbell workout

How To Build Your Own Garage/Home Gym In just a 8 foot by 8 foot square.

By Riccardo Moriani

Intro:

On writing this article I find myself confined to home in the 2nd week of an international lockdown. COVID-19 a novel virus is killing people as I type. So I find myself looking for ways to effectively train myself.

My background is in strength and conditioning and to do that I’ve always found the most effective way to improve performance, body composition, mental and generally health is strength training. It has in my own training helped me recover from chronic back pain, reduced my body fat and kept me on top of things when the stress rises.

What makes a good garage/home gym

When it comes to garage/home gyms you can spend thousands and not use half of it, or you can spend a couple of hundred and use it all.

For me the ultimate goal is function, my function, and study after study have shown that requires strength at some level. As a soldier strength improved my ability to carry my kit, sometimes weighing in excess of 60 Kg, my weapon and myself from a to b. As a rugby player it let me hold up a scrum what felt like single handed sometimes or jump high in the air to receive line out ball. As a middle aged man it now lets me hold my own amongst my much younger work associates. When I age it will let me do so disgracefully as a fully capable self-sufficient individual.

To strength train you just need a few things the first is a bar and some weights. As I speak this are not so easy to come by but in normal situations you can pick up a half decent Olympic bar for a reasonable price.

When purchasing disks you only need to buy what you can currently lift plus an extra 20 kg or so for progression. Purchase the rest as you go.

What to put in your gym

The choice of equipment will be based on your style of training but for the best return for your buck I’d go with an Olympic bar and weights.

If this is your starting point you will also want a platform, to protect the floor and your equipment, and a squat stand, rack or cage of some description, for squatting.

All of this can be purchased but you can save a lot of money and to be honest make a better job if you build your own.

Building your own platform

First you will need to decide what size platform you want. The standard size for a power lifting platform is 8’ by 4’ while a Olympic weight lifting platform should be 8’ by 8’. Unless you do plan to be doing snatches and clean and jerks I would recommend using the power lifting option unless space is no issue.

What you need for the power lifting platform, with squat stand insets

1 Piece of 8’ by 4’ MDF minimum of 18mm thick (I recommend MDF for the base as it is relatively cheap and very flat, plywood can be used but if you intend to screw into it a high grade plywood is recommended.)

1 piece of 4’ by 4’ MDF or grade A plywood (Grade A plywood has no gaps of knots). In my version bellow, I have used a second piece of 8’ by 4’ trimmed down at to create an overlap so the platform can be taken apart easily.

  • Wood glue screws and/or 8 mm dowel rods.
  • Wood saw
  • Screw driver
  • Drill
  • 7 mm drill bit
  • Pilot drill bit
  • 8 mm Dowel rods
  • 24 mm wood screws
  • Strong adhesive

Putting your platform together

  • Measure and mark out your top board for cutting.

The cut outs in the top platform are to allow for a squat stand, rack or cage to be positioned. To work out the width of your narrow end, position your stand in the correct width for the bar and measure the gap between their feet. You can then calculate ‘variable A’ as 122 cm – width between feet / 2.

  • Assemble the pieces of the top platform.

Turn your platform upside down. Place the two base pieces in place drill pilot holes and countersink them. You can now glue and screw the ‘near end base’ to the end of the platform. Dowel rods can be used instead of screws. Holes should be pre drilled before assembly. Five screws or dowels should be sufficient.

Do the same with the ‘back end base’ ensuring you leave enough room for the main base to go snugly between the two. Eight screws or dowels should do this.

  • Position your main base board.

To make your platform easy to move you do not need to glue and screw the main base in place as the rubber mats will hold it in place. If you don’t intend to move it you can glue and screw it in place.

  • Adding the rubber mats

To finish your platform get two 4’ by 2’ (122 cm by 601 cm) rubber horse mats and glue them to the main base either side of the platform.

Once the glue is dry you can varnish the board or leave it unvarnished. You can now place your squat rack in position; you’re ready to work out.

My offer to you.

If you’re going to the trouble of building your own gym your serious, and that’s great.

I’m looking for people serious about improving their life by getting stronger. People who what to claim their Independence for life.

You will soon have nearly everything you need, once you have your home gym built out. Just one thing left…

…your training plan! And I would be honoured if you would let me help with that too.

Too give it a FREE try for one week please click the link below. If after a week it’s not for you just cancel before the first instalment. I won’t think any less of you, I know I’m not for everyone.

If you’ve taken the time to read this far, please take another minute to add a comment. Thank you.

The bent over row from the floor or barbell row

Exercise of the month: The Bent Over Row

When it comes to back work bent over row is a strong choice. The only problem is most people, in fact most trainers, we do it wrong.

Let me clarify, if you want to develop maximum strength, rather than just hypertrophy in the last, the bar must be pulled from the floor. Most people allow the bar to hang from the arms with their body at anywhere between 45 and 80 degrees. The more upright you are the more you can lift, true. But you affect less muscle, creating less adaption and moveover the bar moves a shorter distance (that’s why you can pull more weight as work done = weight X distance), in the same way a half squat compares to a full squat. So don’t massage your ego get results instead.

As for the hang while it enables the post stretch reflex, which will help you lift more, it makes the reps unmeasurable as the bottom of each pull may be different in high.

How To Do A Bent Over Row For Strength

Start with the bar on the floor, bumper plates are great for this as they give you a set high for each rep whatever weight you use.

Lean over the bar and grab hold. Use the grip your most comfortable with over hand hits more triceps, under hand more biceps.

With your back parallel to the floor lift the chest to brace the back. You do not need to artificially retract the shoulder blades, they will come back as you pull, if you pull hard and far enough. The lift should start with a hip thrust while keeping the back level. Then pull the bar virtually slamming it into the upper belly.

For a rep to count it must reach the stomach.

are you up for the Sugar Challenge

Sugar Challenge

😻I know you… and you’re already sweet enough. Adding extra sugar to your daily diet is unnecessary and definitely not good for you!

☣🧁So this week we’re going to be getting rid of ADDED SUGARS in our diets!

😲 There’s a HUGE difference between the natural sugars found in foods, and the added sugars that we put in our drinks and foods.

🧐 The scary thing is, these days sugar can sneak up on you with at least 60 different names, making them difficult to spot when scanning your labels.

In fact, here’s a great list with about 56 of them for you: www.healthline.com/nutrition/56-different-names-for-sugar

🍓It’s recommended that we (as adults) limit our daily-added sugar intake to around 25 grams, or 6 teaspoons a day.

❎🍪Your challenge this week is to avoid ANY added sugars to your diet! (this includes food AND drinks)

🥝 Fruit? It’s absolutely fine … it brings in a wide-variety of vitamins, minerals, and other micronutrients along with fiber.

But coffee or tea with sugar? SORRY!!!

If you absolutely, positively MUST add a little sweetness, I’d rather you go with these than sugar:

🍯Raw Honey (go easy on this if you’re watching your weight because the calories add up fast)

🌿Stevia

🥥Coconut Sugar

🧐 Now, be sure this week to check all of your nutrition labels …. even on items you’d never imagine (like bread, crackers and other processed foods) because sugar is added to pretty much everything.

After only one week without added sugar, your body and brain will be thanking you!

So, are you and your sweet tooth up for the challenge?! Let us know in a comment below! And keep us posted with how you’re doing and any successes or struggles.

I hope that helps you with your sweet tooth

“And, just so you know, I’m putting together a brand-new program starting 3rd Feb 2020. This is specifically for parents, who want to kick their bad habits and set a good example for your children, in 60 days. It’s a remote program, so you can join from anywhere in the world.

I’m looking for 10 to test it out at a HUGE DISCOUNT, help me work out the kinks, and get amazing results that I can use as a case study. If that’s you, comment ‘tell me more’ below and I’ll message you with the details.”

online personal training

Exercise of the month: The Low Bar Squat

In short, done well, the squat or more specifically the low bar squat is the best exercise for all round development bar none. And now let me explain why…

Whatever your goal is. Be it strength, fitness, physique or health, squatting is one of the most fundamental movements we perform on a hourly basis. Just think about how many times a day do you sit down and stand up again? And once you have lost the ability to get up out your seat (squat) you also lose your independence, and that’s something none of us want.

So why don’t most trainers teach the low bar squat?

I believe the low bar squat isn’t used more is a mix of misinformation and lack of knowledge. So for most personal trainers, they only ever learn the high bar variety, as is easier to teach, and wrongly believed to be safer for clients.

Why the low bar squat?

Obviously the squat is not the only leg exercise out there, so why not do others instead?

Yes exercises like the deadlift are great exercises but let’s compare the deadlift to the squat, and the major muscles and joints being used.

High Bar
Squat

Quad
dominant

Knee dominant

Full range of knee but not hip movement

Use stretch shortening cycle

Low Bar
Squat

quad / Glute / Hamstring dominant

Hip dominant

Full range of movement

Use stretch shortening cycle

Traditional
Deadlift

Glute / Hamstring dominant

Hip dominant

Partial range of movement

Don’t use stretch shortening cycle

So the high bar squat more commonly used by regular gym goers is quad dominant. If your a bodybuilder after big thighs you may think this is the way to go, but wait…

Another reason is, the high bar has the back in a more vertical position, this reduces shear (a cutting action across the length of the back). Better for those with back problems, or is it…

You can lift more in a deadlift thus increase in strength gain should be greater, but it’s not…

Here’s why!

The low bar squat, like the high bar squat, also works the quad though it’s full range of movement. Due to a heavier weight can be used will develop the quads equally well without them becoming the limiting factor as soon.

Shear, while it sounds dramatic is hyperfetical, i.e. its never happened to anybody. So you are far more likely to put your back out picking up a pen from the floor. An action that moves the vertebrae into flexion and rotation (bends and twists) at the same time.
The low bar due to the increased angle will force your back to get stronger, which is inherently better for it.

Yes you can lift more in a deadlift than the low bar squat. This is due to the reduced joint angle at the hip resulting in biomechanical advantage. The low bar squat works the hips though the full range of movement resulting in higher strength gain throughout the muscles of the hips and better stability of the hip.

A more stable hip means more stable knees and back, so we result in less knee, hip and back pain.

Reference:

The Barbell Prescription Strength Training For Life After 40


home barbell routine

Why I prioritize strength training over cardio beyond your 40s

As we get older more and more of us are showing an interest in our fitness that we took for granted in our youth. But when start this new fitness journey what should we prioritize, strength training or cardiovascular. There is no doubt cardio has a place in healthy lifestyle but what does hours on treadmills, roads and bike bring to the table and can we get it else were?

Tradition Cardiovascular Fitness Training

For many over 40’s cardio has been seen as the key to fitness, with endurance sports especially, and to some extent I agree. So if you want to be a great endurance athlete or even just finish a fun run, you need to practice running.

Now the primary aim of cardiovascular exercise as its name suggests is to work the heart and lungs. So put on your running shoes and start pounding the streets and what happens. If you haven’t trained in a while you’re so out of breath after 100 yrs you have to walk the rest or worse stop and prop up a lamppost for a while. So as you gain more experience this easies and you can jog the whole route, great.

Now let’s look at what’s happening to your lower body. Each time your foot strikes the ground a shock wave passes up the body. This can have a major impact on joint health especially knees, hips and even backs.

Metabolism is raised while doing and traditional cardio so one hour at a decent intensity may burn off as many as six hundred Calories, which has obvious benefits to anyone trying to control body weight. This will then reduce down over the following two hours to return to normal. Now, this is giving you a net gain of say six hundred and twenty extra Calories for the day.

High Intensity Interval training  

HIIT has been a hit for many in the last decade; it has many of the benefits of tradition cardio and can be done in far less time. Great you say.

Ok with HIIT your workout intensity is now going up your repetitions down, so what is happening to the lower body. We have reduced potential chronic wear and tear risk, but simply replaced it with an increased risk of acute injury of the soft tissues, such as ligaments, tendons and of course muscles.

Metabolism with HIIT is also raised and the same six hundred can be burn in just twenty minutes. On this occasion however, the metabolism takes longer to reduce to normal, as full recovery takes longer. We could be looking at twelve to twenty four hours of extra calorie expenditure. So in this case net gain could be around eight hundred to twelve hundred for the workout. You can see while it became so popular so quickly.

Strength Training

Lifting weights with good form while using a well constructed and periodised training programme, can not only make you stronger, but it can also improve structural alignment, provide support for joints (both cartilage and soft tissue), both of which reduces ware and injury risk. So when we do our running we remain injury free.

In addition strength training is CARDIOVASCULAR as well. Just take your heart rate after a set of heavy squats. It has been shown time and again to improve endurance performance, Mo Farah being a prime example. Reportedly after a training camp in the USA where he only did weight training he return to produce a PB.

Not only that but by increasing lean muscle tissue we raise metabolism permanently making weight control easier. If that was not enough benefit for weight control let’s look at the calories per session. In a one hour session we will probably but less than doing cardio, around four to four hundred and fifty Calories, but look what happens to the metabolism after. If you worked hard in your session your metabolism could be raised for two to three DAYS after the session. Let’s ‘do the math’ as the Americans would say. We have four hundred and fifty Calories from the session and then around five hundred additional calories from each day of recover, a net gain of one thousand nine hundred and fifty Calories a workout. We aim for three thousand five hundred calorie deficit a week for a one pound weight loss, so just two one hour workouts is enough for one pound of FAT loss a week.

But it doesn’t stop there!

Health benefits of just do weight training far outweigh those of just doing cardio. There is now a stack of evidence showing the more muscle you have in later life the long and better quality of life you are likely to have, and none of us are getting any younger.

In summary

I’m not against cardio and if you are training for a specific event like a marathon you will need to get your miles in. What I am saying is at least once or preferably twice a week, you need to go do so strength training and pick up something heavy.

If you are new to weight training or need help putting together a good training plan, get some qualified help, learning good technique early is far better than fixing it later when the damage is done. Machines, functional training and Crossfit are all ok in your first six months, after that you need then need to learn to progress your lifting properly to remain successful in your health and fitness goals.

“And, just so you know, I’m putting together a brand-new online challenge program starting in February 2020 . This is specifically for men and women in from 35 to 55, who want to be stronger, leaner and healthier in 60 days. It’s a remote program, so you can join from anywhere in the world.

I’m looking for 5 people to test it out at a HUGE DISCOUNT, help me work out the kinks, and get amazing results that I can use as a case study. If that’s you, comment ‘tell me more’ below and I’ll message you with the details.”